LinkedGov celebrates as Chancellor prioritises open data

At LinkedGov we’re very pleased to have George Osborne reaffirm the government’s commitment to and backing of open public data. With mentions of hackcamps, public apps and the power of transparency in this morning’s speech by the Chancellor, the Treasury is demonstrating an appreciation for linked government data.

Underscoring the wisdom of crowds approach the Chancellor’s announcement about the recruitment of Beth Noveck to forward this agenda will add renewed focus to LinkedGov’s work. Beth Noveck’s work on public participation and collaboration is both well known and well regarded and we are excited to welcome her to our community.

It’s not yet clear whether Beth will be joining the Treasury, Cabinet Office or No 10 (or another dept) in her work but we look forward to what she’s bringing to the UK.

16
May 2011
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Hackcamp – the hacks, the winners .. the movie!

LinkedGov had its first hack camp last weekend (April 9th and 10th) in Shoreditch, organised with the fantastic help of Geeks of London. ‘Keep Calm and Hack On’ was a roaring success, may thanks to all of you who heeded our call to ‘Enlist for Victory!’

Over the weekend 19 hacks were submitted, and some mighty good hacks they were. Here are the prize winners:

Winner of Jury’s and People’s Choice
Alec Muffet, Francisco Baptista, Patrick Sinclair
Winner of the “Serious Silliness” award
Johanna  Kollmann, K Vong, Seyi Ogunyemi
Winner of the “Best UX” award
Sam Machin
Co-winner of the “Best Mobile App” award
Kieran Gutteridge
Co-winner of the “Best Mobile App” award
Adam Braimbridge
Winner of “Best use of data/Best commercial sauce” award
Tom Gladhill

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The EU tariff dataset/API and Foreign & Commonwealth Office travel advice API seem to have been particular favourites to hack with. If you have any requests for public data that we can help facilitate please get in touch!

You can watch a video of the presentations courtesy of @ProactivePaul.

15
Apr 2011
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A few words from our sponsors. Obesity and risk of hearing loss

Background & aims

The existing yet limited prospective studies reported conflicting results about obesity and hearing loss. We investigated the prospective association between obesity and hearing loss in a large-scale Japanese working population, as well as the association between metabolic phenotype and hearing loss. Read more about clinical trial services for drug development.

Methods

The study included 48,549 employees aged 20–64 years and free of hearing loss at baseline. Pure-tone audiometric testing was performed annually to identify hearing loss at 1 and 4 kHz. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to investigate the risk of hearing loss associated with body mass index (BMI) and metabolic phenotype (based on a BMI of ≥25.0/<25.0 kg/m 2 and presence/absence of ≥2 components of metabolic syndrome, except waist circumference). Baseline and updated information were obtained from annual health checkups. Check the latest fit after 50 reviews.

Results

With a median follow-up of 7 years, 1595 and 3625 individuals developed unilateral hearing loss at 1 and 4 kHz, respectively. The adjusted hazard ratios (HR) for hearing loss at 1 kHz were 1.21 (1.08, 1.36) and 1.66 (1.33, 2.08) for those with BMI 25.0–29.9 kg/m 2 and BMI ≥30.0 kg/m 2, respectively, compared to individuals with BMI <25.0 kg/m 2. For hearing loss at 4 kHz, the corresponding HRs were 1.14 (1.05, 1.23) and 1.29 (1.09, 1.52). Compared with metabolically healthy non-obese individuals, the adjusted HRs for hearing loss at 1 kHz were 1.19 (1.03, 1.39), 1.27 (1.01, 1.61), and 1.48 (1.25, 1.76) for unhealthy non-obese, healthy obese, and unhealthy obese individuals, respectively. For hearing loss at 4 kHz, the corresponding HRs were 1.13 (1.04, 1.25), 1.21 (1.04, 1.41), and 1.26 (1.12, 1.41). Read more about nutrisystem benefits.

Conclusions

Overweight and obesity are associated with an increased risk of hearing loss, and metabolically unhealthy obesity may confer additional risk. Make sure you treat overweight with natural supplements, like leptoconnect.
09
Apr 2011
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Hackcamp waitlist for reallocated tickets

Following a very kind shout out from the Guardian’s Charles Arthur  we are conscious there will be expressions of interests for more tickets, which have unfortunately sold out.

However, there is a wait list for returned tickets (on EventBrite) where you can register your interest.

If you do want to come and have not been able to get a ticket please do register on the waitlist for potential returns. Equally if you have a ticket and can no longer make it please  email Geeks of London and your ticket will be reallocated.

07
Apr 2011
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Hack Day – April 9th and 10th

Sometimes, during security audits, we may encounter a situation where everything is being managed correctly. In other words security patches, policies, network segmentation, antivirus, and user awareness, to name just a few measures, are being applied properly. That’s when, in order to continue the analysis from the perspective of a security researcher or consultant, social engineering and a number of other tools, some of which we will look at in this post, start to play more importance, being perhaps the only ones that can allow an attacker to penetrate the target system. Find out which ones are the best true wireless earbuds.

The tools in question are mainly pieces of hardware designed for security research or projects. So here’s a list of the 10 tools every white hat hacker needs.

#1 Raspberry Pi 3

1

Raspberry Pi 3 Model B. Source: raspberrypi.org

We are now on the third generation of these low-budget computers, which can be used in multiple ways. A classic example in security audits is to use a Raspberry Pi with its appropriate battery pack, a distribution platform like Kali Linux, and applications like FruityWifi, which together act like the Swiss army knife of pen testing.

#2 WiFi Pineapple*

Source: WiFi Pineapple

Source: WiFi Pineapple

This set of tools for wireless penetration tests is very useful for various types of attacks, such as man-in-the-middle attack. Through an intuitive web interface, it enables you to connect using any device, such as a smartphone or a tablet. It stands out for its ease of use, workflow management, the detailed information it provides, and the possibility it offers to emulate different kinds of advanced attacks, which are always just a couple of clicks away.

As a platform, WiFi Pineapple allows the use of a great many modules, which are continually being developed by the user community, thus adding new features that widen its scope of functionality. The icing on the cake is that these modules can be installed free of charge directly via the web interface in a matter of seconds.

#3 Alfa Network Board*

A classic Wi-Fi board for injecting packets. The Alfa stands out for the quality of its materials, and for its use of chipsets which can be set to monitoring mode – a requirement for wireless audits.

#4 Rubber Ducky*

Source: USB Rubber Ducky

Source: USB Rubber Ducky

This “special” pen drive is a device that works as a programmed keyboard in the shape of a USB drive. When you plug it into a computer, it starts writing automatically to launch programs and tools which may either be available on the victim computer or loaded onto the drive’s onboard Micro SD, in order to extract information.

If you watch the hit TV series Mr. Robot, you’ll likely remember that in the second season Rubber Ducky is a crucial ally for Angela, helping her gain access to an E Corp executive’s passwords.

#5 LAN Turtle*

Source: LAN Turtle

Source: LAN Turtle

This type of systems admin and pen-test tool provides stealthy remote access, as it stays connected to a USB port covertly. Besides this, it allows users to harvest information from the network and has the capacity to execute a man-in-the-middle attack.

#6 HackRF One

Source: Great Scott Gadgets

Source: Great Scott Gadgets

This tool installs a powerful SDR (Software-Defined Radio) system. In other words it is essentially a radio communication device which installs software to be used in place of typically installed hardware. This way, it is capable of processing all kinds of radio signals ranging from 10 MHz to 6 GHz from a single peripheral, which can be connected to the computer via a USB port.

#7 Ubertooth One

Source: Ubertooth One™

Source: Ubertooth One™

This device is an open-source 2.4 GHz code development platform for experimenting with Bluetooth, enabling users to appreciate the different aspects of new wireless technologies.

#8 Proxmark3 Kit

Source: Hacker Warehouse

Source: Hacker Warehouse

The Proxmark3 is a device developed by Jonathan Westhues that can read almost any RFID (radio frequency identification) label, as well as clone and sniff them. It can also be operated in standalone mode (i.e. without a PC) through the use of batteries.

04
Apr 2011
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